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TrustedAdvisor Associates Workshops & Events, Fall 2010

Join us this Fall at one or more of our 2010 TrustedAdvisor Associates events in Washington, DC; Livingston, NJ; and through globally accessed webinars!  Topics will include: the principles of Trust-based Selling(r), Being a Trusted Advisor: Walking the Talk, and "How Smart Companies Make the Sale."
 
We hope you’ll be able to attend and  look forward to seeing you!

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Tues. Sept. 21st         Global Access          Charles H. Green

Charlie will be a presenter in the 2010 Mediation Business Summit webinar. He’ll talk about how the sales process is a powerful opportunity to create trust and how behaving in the a trustworthy manner during the sales process both creates customer trust and enhances the odds of getting the sale. He’ll outline the principles of Trust-based Selling(r) and discuss how to respond to the Six Toughest Sales Questions. Cost: $100 to attend entire event 8 speakers, via telephone. For more information and to register, visit http://mediationbusinesssummit.com/register/.
 

Tues. Sept. 28th          Washington, DC          Andrea Howe & Charles H. Green

Interested in learning how to increase trust anywhere, with anyone, anytime? Register now for Trusted Advisor Associates’ signature program,  Being a Trusted Advisor: Walking the Talk, co-led by Andrea Howe and Charles H. Green. All early registration seats are filled;register now before the program sells out!

Tues. Oct. 26th        Livingston, NJ          Charles H. Green

For Sobel & Co’s 5th Annual Business Symposium for Privately-Owned Companies, Charlie will speak on "How Smart Companies Make the Sale." Presentation 4-6PM, cocktail reception following. Westminister Hotel, 550 West Mount Pleasant Avenue, Livingston, New Jersey. Limited seating, RSVP only to Sally Glick at 973.994.9494 or Sally.Glick@sobel-cpa.com

Moments of Truth, Improvised

Anyone who’s been in professional services for more than a week has probably encountered a tricky client situation or two. Some examples:

– A prospective client asks you point blank, “What experience do you have in xyz industry?” and even though you saw that question coming, you didn’t think it would be quite so direct, and the honest answer is zero, zip, nada—only you’re afraid to say so because you think it’s a deal-breaker and you’ve got other relevant experience that surely they’ll want to hear about before summarily dismissing you!

– You thought the draft deliverable you turned in yesterday was pretty good until you got an email from your client saying how disappointed she is in the product and that, quite frankly, she’s seriously re-considering sending you to London for the next and largest revenue-producing phase of the project.

– You’re seconds away from beginning a meeting with a very senior client, originally scheduled to discuss how to expand the successful work you’re doing together, but an hour earlier you accidentally overheard him in the lunchroom speaking with colleagues about dumping your company and hiring your number one competitor instead.

(By the way: 2 of those 3 really happened to us: which is the made-up story?)

I call these Moments of Truth—when something happens, and suddenly it feels like you’re alone on a sinking ship with no life preserver in sight, and you’d rather be anywhere but where you are.

Daniel Goleman, author of “Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ,” taught us to understand the science behind our reaction, using the phrase “amygdala hijack” to describe how our well-functioning “thinking brain” (the neocortex) gets completely overruled by the part of the brain that manages our survival. Then our amygdala-threatened-selves do stupid things like spin a great story of how we don’t exactly have direct experience in xyz industry but blah blah blah … or subtly (and maybe overtly) blame our colleague for the sub-par work product … or completely sidestep an awkward interaction altogether in favor of maintaining the pretense that everything really is OK after all. In other words: we’re in fight or flight mode, and often both at once.

Moments of Truth become Moments of Learning

We spend a lot of time dealing with Moments of Truth in our learning programs because they happen a lot in your business relationships. How you handle them speaks volumes about what you’re made of. It speaks to whether or not you have the mindset, motives, and agility of a Trusted Advisor. Being effective in a Moment of Truth requires more than mastering a few behavioral tricks; it demands a new way of thinking and being.

So we do a lot of out-of-the-box experiential learning that deals on the spot with your own live, real situations. Occasionally we use our own caselets for you to experiment with—ones that have been tested for a decade and earned a special place in the hearts of our alumni, like “The Lunchroom.” In other words, we do what most classroom learners universally dread: we role-play.

All right, collective groan–I know, I know, I hate role-playing too. It’s scary and contrived. And there’s never enough background or history or facts to be really comfortable in a role-play. It’s a common refrain during debriefs: “If only I’d known more about the situation I could have handled it better.”

But let’s be real: How many times have you prepped for hours for a meeting, only to learn in the first two minutes that the client just came out of another meeting in which a major decision was made that completely alters not only your agenda for this meeting but your entire set of recommendations for the engagement?

In a Moment of Truth, background and history and facts don’t matter one iota because your reptilian brain doesn’t care—it’s focused exclusively on the emotions of the moment. It has neither the time nor the inclination to process anything else.

Q. Faced with an MOT, what’s a Trusted Advisor to do?

A. Learn how to improvise.

The Practice of Improvisation: a Key Trusted Advisor Capability

To improvise is to “invent, compose, or perform with little or no preparation.” Which is exactly what is called for in a Moment of Truth—the ability to deal on the spot with something unexpected.

Believe it or not, you get better at improvising by practicing improvisation. (And that only sounds like an oxymoron—it’s actually very true). Practice is exactly how professional improv comedians (think, Whose Line is it, Anyway?) become so skilled at their craft.

They practice being quick to respond instead of over-thinking. They practice “yes-and” responses, where they build on what’s already been said, instead of contradicting or denying what someone else has already offered. They practice subordinating their own egos to support what’s being created by the collective instead of hogging the spotlight and stealing a scene. They practice giving up being clever and witty and funny and instead get real.

How do they do this? They get together and … role-play. They do it again and again, always with new scenarios and relationships that are completely made up on the spot. And when it’s show time and the curtain goes up, they still have no idea what they’re going to create together because everything is based on audience suggestion. But what they do know is that they’re fully rehearsed at being responsive, collaborative, and authentic.

In Trusted Advisor terms, they’re credible, transparent, other-oriented, related.

And that is something worth practicing to get good at. So: role-plays? Yep, role-plays.

The Trusted Advisor/Improviser—a Brief Commercial

If you think your skills could use a tune up or you wish you felt more confident in the Moments of Truth you face with your clients and colleagues, we’d love to have you come practice with us Sept 28 and 29 in Washington, DC. Being a Trusted Advisor: Walking the Talk is a rare opportunity to immerse yourself in the mindsets and skill sets of a Trusted Advisor.

We’ll improvise. We’ll laugh a lot. And we’ll be sure you walk away with far greater value than you expected.

Trust Me, I’m from HR/ IT/ Legal/ Finance !

When we hear the phrase “Trusted Advisor,” most of us think of external experts: consultants, actuaries, accountants, lawyers, the professions. But there is another group for whom that term is at least as relevant—maybe even more so. That group is made up of internal staff functions: and mainly the “Staff Big Four:” HR, IT, Legal and Finance.

These internal staff have exactly the same challenge that their outside brethren have—to successfully persuade and influence others, over whom they have exactly zero direct authority.

But it’s worse for internals: first, because they eat in the same lunchroom as their clients and are known by their first names, they tend to not get the same respect that outside experts do.

Second: an internal consultant can’t fire his or her client. They are joined at the hip, like a married couple, for better or worse.

The Big 4 staff functions represent a big chunk of our business at Trusted Advisor Associates, not far behind external Trusted Advisor work, at about the same level as Trust-Based Selling work.. And although the keys to success are pretty much the same for internal advisors as for externals, there are some distinct cultural problems that each of the Big 4 staff functions face. 

Differences Between the "Big 4" Staff Functions Affecting Trust

The IT Challenge. Ask any line employee. “The problem with IT,” they’ll say, is “they use too much jargon and don’t deliver on time or on budget.” Strip out the value-laden words and what we hear is that IT has a reputation for being non-user-friendly, and that its big trust opportunity may lie in improving reliability.

The HR Challenge. Unlike their IT brethren, HR suffers from speaking the same language as everyone else; which means everyone else feels equal to them in expertise. AS HR folks will tell you: they "can’t get no respect;" and the more they ask for it, they less they get.

The Legal Challenge. You know this one too. “The trouble with lawyers is, they always tell me what I can’t do, and don’t help me with what I can do.” Let’s translate that into simply a predilection for avoiding Type 1 error (doing the wrong thing) at the cost of Type 2 error (not doing the right thing). Let’s call this one a misalignment around risk profiles.

The Finance Challenge. Finance tends to speak clearly, meet deadlines, and be very sober about risk. In fact, very sober about pretty much everything. The fear that clients have of finance people is that of being relentlessly ground down on budgets, financial analyses, plans and forecasts. They are relentlessly, somberly, right. 

Each of these groups can take some simple, solid steps toward improving their level of trust by their clients. (And if you’re an external, keep reading: this applies to you too).

Five Trust-Enhancing Opportunities Facing Key Staff Functions

 
HR
IT
Legal
Finance

Credibility

x
 
 
 

Reliability

 
x
 
 

Intimacy

 
x
 
x

Self-Orientation

x
 
x
 

Risk focus

 
 
x
x

 

Improving Credibility. More an issue for HR than the others, remember that credibility is not only—in fact, not even mainly—an issue of credentials. The average internal client is not impressed that you have advanced degrees, or that you are a recognized expert in OD. You can argue that’s not fair, but arguing fairness just digs the hole deeper. 

What improves credibility is the capacity to apply your knowledge to a specific client situation–in their language. Instead of letting the client know that you’ve seen the latest, greatest research on teaching emotional intelligence—instead, use emotional intelligence yourself to help identify, and identify yourself with, client issues. For example, “Joe, do you find your people are as involved in work as you’d like them to be? Where do you see that playing out? And how big an issue is it for you? In what terms?”

Improving reliability. Reliability—an issue that affects IT more than the other Big Four–is one of the four key components of the Trust Equation, and one of the easiest to correct. Simple awareness is a good place to begin. Reliability lends itself far more easily to measurement than do the other components of trust (credibility, intimacy, low self-orientation); figure out good measures of reliability, and track them. Think you’re already doing the most you can? Try increasing the number of promises you make, even small ones; then make sure to meet them.

Improving Intimacy. Intimacy is the variable that makes an advisor ‘client-friendly.’ Intimacy skills are what make a client feel comfortable sharing, or not sharing, information with you.  If you’re being constantly shunted into a role which is far short of your capabilities, this is one area to focus on (the other is self-orientation—see below). 

You don’t have to resort to commenting on kids’ pictures, college degrees and ‘how ‘bout them Bulls.’ Make it a point to learn things about your clients’ business lives—then ask them for help in understanding things that you genuinely don’t understand about them.

Self-Orientation. We find that nearly everyone can improve their trustworthiness by getting better at lowering their self-orientation (see “Get Off Your S”). Within the Big Four staff functions, this is particularly useful for the HR and IT organizations. Too many clients see HR as whiney, and lawyers as officious, both of which are forms of overly developed self-orientation.

The solution is harder than for the other issues, but well within reach. Simply be very, very sure to see issues from the client’s vantage point—not just from yours. No one’s asking you to abdicate your professional perspectives, just to see it as well from the other side of the table. If a client says to you, “We want to do X, how can we do it?” make sure to start with, “Interesting idea; let me make sure I understand what this means to you. Tell me more about what you could do with this, how it would make you more successful. I want to make sure I know where you’re coming from before I try to comment.”

Risk-Orientation. Both Finance and Legal get heavily tarred with the brush of being too risk-averse. To some extent that may seem unfair; after all, part of their job is indeed, to manage downside risk. 

But organizations that adopt an adversarial relationship, where Staff represents the downside and Line argues for the upside, are creating vast areas of unnecessary cost, mistrust and confusion. It’s far better to create collaborative relationships, where issues can be sorted out mutually, at the issue by issue and person by person level.

While improving self-orientation and intimacy skills are certainly relevant for many legal and financial people, there is still an underlying disconnect about risk. This disconnect has to be called out at the start. It’s no good having lawyers and finance people suggesting, from the get-go, that their role is to reign in the irrational exuberance of those id- and ego-driven people out there in the market; we can look at the pharmaceutical and investment banking industries as pockets where the relationship has deteriorated into such a caricature, and it is not pretty.

Instead, staff people have to state the terms at the outset: ‘We are here to collaborate with you in jointly determining the right amount of business risk to take on, consistent with legal, regulatory and market-based risk. We all work for the same organization; and we’re committed to working with you.’

Then, walk the talk.


Note: This article is also available in .pdf article form for ease in forwarding: Trust Me, I’m from HR/ IT/ Legal/ Finance ! [pdf]

TrustedAdvisor Associates Workshops September 2010

It’s hard to believe Summer is practically out, although the weather still lingers. But school has started and with that comes the Fall hustle & bustle. We’ve been preparing for a jam-packed September and now it is finally upon us. We hope to see many of you at our events listed below. Keep an eye out for a few more additions by next week as well.

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Tues. Sept. 21st      Global Access          Charles H. Green

Charlie will be a presenter in the 2010 Mediation Business Summit webinar. He’ll talk about how the sales process is a powerful opportunity to create trust and how behaving in the a trustworthy manner during the sales process both creates customer trust and enhances the odds of getting the sale. He’ll outline the principles of Trust-based Selling(r) and discuss how to respond to the Six Toughest Sales Questions. Cost: $100 to attend entire event 8 speakers, via telephone. For more information and to register, visit http://mediationbusinesssummit.com/register/.

  Best of Organizational Development Summit (UPDATE)
with Andrea Howe
Chicago, IL
Sept 21-24th, 2011        

Change of plan! Andrea Howe, Director of Learning Programs, will be participating in Linkage Inc’s Best of Organizational Development Summit in 2011 rather than 2010. We’ll remind you closer to the date!

 

Tues. Sept. 28th          Washington, DC          Andrea Howe & Charles H. Green

Interested in learning how to increase trust anywhere, with anyone, anytime? Register now for Trusted Advisor Associates’ signature program,  Being a Trusted Advisor: Walking the Talk, co-led by Andrea Howe and Charles H. Green. All early registration seats are filled;register now before the program sells out!

Upcoming Events 8/20/10

There’s been some construction to our calendar; we wanted to call attention to our changes.  Andrea Howe, our Director of Learning Programs, will now be speaking at 2011’s Best of Organizational Development Summit (see below for more information).

Other than that, we hope you take advantage of the weekend!

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Fri. Aug. 20th         Singapore          Trip Allen

Trip Allen will be speaking on the subject of The Trust Edge: Being a Trusted Advisor at the Singapore Gifts and Stationary Show.  1:00-2:00PM. Venue: Marina Bay Sands Casino and Resort Sands Expo and Convention  Centre, Level 1 Hall C, Singapore.  For more information, please take a look at the official event website.

Tues. Sept. 21st      Global Access          Charles H. Green

Charlie will be a presenter in the 2010 Mediation Business Summit webinar. He’ll talk about how the sales process is a powerful opportunity to create trust and how behaving in the a trustworthy manner during the sales process both creates customer trust and enhances the odds of getting the sale. He’ll outline the principles of Trust-based Selling(r) and discuss how to respond to the Six Toughest Sales Questions. Cost: $100 to attend entire event 8 speakers, via telephone. For more information and to register, visit http://mediationbusinesssummit.com/register/.

Tues-Fri. Sept 21-24th          Chicago          Andrea Howe

Change of plan! Andrea Howe, Director of Learning Programs, will be participating in Linkage Inc’s Best of Organizational Development Summit in 2011, rather than 2010. We’ll remind you closer to the time!
 

Tues. Sept. 28th          Washington, DC          Andrea Howe & Charles H. Green

Interested in learning how to increase trust anywhere, with anyone, anytime? Register now for Trusted Advisor Associates’ signature program,  Being a Trusted Advisor: Walking the Talk, co-led by Andrea Howe and Charles H. Green. All early registration seats are filled;register now before the program sells out!

Upcoming Events 7/30/10

Summer days–oh, how they keep us occupied. Between the beautiful sunshine that beckons us out and the sweltering heat that keeps us in, we’ve managed to keep our wits about us and our calendar in order. With September slowly creeping in, we’re set for the next few big events here at Trusted Advisor Associates. Are you?

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Tues. Sept. 21st      Global Access          Charles H. Green

Charlie will be a presenter in the 2010 Mediation Business Summit webinar. He’ll talk about how the sales process is a powerful opportunity to create trust and how behaving in the a trustworthy manner during the sales process both creates customer trust and enhances the odds of getting the sale. He’ll outline the principles of Trust-based Selling(r) and discuss how to respond to the Six Toughest Sales Questions. Cost: $100 to attend entire event 8 speakers, via telephone. For more information and to register, visit http://mediationbusinesssummit.com/register/.

Tues-Fri. Sept 21-24th          Chicago          Andrea Howe

Andrea Howe, Director of Learning Programs, will be a Learning Team Leader for Linkage Inc’s 2010 Best of Organizational Development Summit and will be leading a session on "Client Relationships: Making Yourself more Trustworthy."

Tues. Sept. 28th          Washington, DC          Andrea Howe & Charles H. Green

Interested in learning how to increase trust anywhere, with anyone, anytime? Register now for Trusted Advisor Associates’ signature program,  Being a Trusted Advisor: Walking the Talk, co-led by Andrea Howe and Charles H. Green. All early registration seats are filled;register now before the program sells out!

Upcoming Events 7/23/10

Another weekly event update; hope you can join us for some of the programs listed below.  ALL of our early bird registration for our September program "Being a Trusted Advisor: Walking the Talk" have been filled–don’t get left behind though, we still have seats open at our regular pricing. Join Us! 

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Thurs. July 29th          Singapore          Trip Allen

Preview trust-based skills and techniques that allow you to forge quicker yet long-lasting relationships, so as to increase your overall business. Trip will be speaking on Trust Edge: Trust-based Selling & Business Development at Marketing Institute of Singapore (MIS). 6:00–9:00PM. Open to the public. Fees: MIS  Student/Member-$20; Partner-$35; Non-member-$35. Venue: MIS Executive Club (51 Anson Road, #03-53 Anson Centre, Singapore 079904). For more information, please take a look at the brochure.

Tues. Aug. 10th      Global Access          Sandy Styer

Sandy Styer, the head of the Trusted Advisor Diagnostics group, will present the findings of  the largest study on trustworthiness ever completed: the Trusted Advisor Whitepaper entitled "Think Again", and the implications for business This research covered over 12,000 respondents. FREE. 10:00AM EST. 30 minutes duration. Contact: Tdelcamp@trustedadvisor.com to register.

Sat. Sept. 18th      Global Access          Charles H. Green

Charlie will be a presenter in the 2010 Mediation Business Summit webinar. He’ll talk about how the sales process is a powerful opportunity to create trust and how behaving in the a trustworthy manner during the sales process both creates customer trust and enhances the odds of getting the sale. He’ll outline the principles of Trust-based Selling(r) and discuss how to respond to the Six Toughest Sales Questions. Cost: $100 to attend entire event 8 speakers, via telephone. For more information and to register, visit http://mediationbusinesssummit.com/register/.

Tues-Fri. Sept 21-24th          Chicago          Andrea Howe

Andrea Howe, Director of Learning Programs, will be a Learning Team Leader for Linkage Inc’s 2010 Best of Organizational Development Summit and will be leading a session on "Client Relationships: Making Yourself more Trustworthy."

Tues. Sept. 28th          Washington, DC          Andrea Howe & Charles H. Green

Interested in learning how to increase trust anywhere, with anyone, anytime? Register now for Trusted Advisor Associates’ signature program,  Being a Trusted Advisor: Walking the Talk; co-led by Andrea Howe and Charles H. Green. All early registration seats are filled; register now before the program sells out!

Upcoming Events 7/16/2010

It’s hard to believe we’re halfway through July. 2010 seems to be going full-speed ahead. As are we, here at Trusted Advisors. With time going by so quickly, it’s hard to keep tabs on the days. So, hopefully you mark some of these events in your calendars now and beat the rush!

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Thurs. July 29th          Singapore          Trip Allen

Preview trust-based skills and techniques that allow you to forge quicker yet long-lasting relationships, so as to increase your overall business. Trip will be speaking on Trust Edge: Trust-based Selling & Business Development at Marketing Institute of Singapore (MIS). 6:00–9:00PM. Open to the public. Fees: MIS  Student/Member-$20; Partner-$35; Non-member-$35. Venue: MIS Executive Club (51 Anson Road, #03-53 Anson Centre, Singapore 079904). For more information, please take a look at the brochure.

Tues. Aug. 10th      Global Access          Sandy Styer

Sandy Styer, the head of the Trusted Advisor Diagnostics group, will present the findings of  the largest study on trustworthiness ever completed: the Trusted Advisor Whitepaper entitled "Think Again", and the implications for business This research covered over 12,000 respondents. FREE. 10:00AM EST. 30 minutes duration. Contact: Tdelcamp@trustedadvisor.com to register.

Sat. Sept. 18th      Global Access          Charles H. Green

Charlie will be a presenter in the 2010 Mediation Business Summit webinar. He’ll talk about how the sales process is a powerful opportunity to create trust and how behaving in the a trustworthy manner during the sales process both creates customer trust and enhances the odds of getting the sale. He’ll outline the principles of Trust-based Selling(r) and discuss how to respond to the Six Toughest Sales Questions. Cost: $100 to attend entire event 8 speakers, via telephone. For more information and to register, visit http://mediationbusinesssummit.com/register/.

Tues-Fri. Sept 21-24th          Chicago          Andrea Howe

Andrea Howe, Director of Learning Programs, will be a Learning Team Leader for Linkage Inc’s 2010 Best of Organizational Development Summit and will be leading a session on "Client Relationships: Making Yourself more Trustworthy."

Tues. Sept. 28th          Washington, DC          Andrea Howe & Charles H. Green

Interested in learning how to increase trust anywhere, with anyone, anytime? Register now for Trusted Advisor Associates’ signature program,  Being a Trusted Advisor: Walking the Talk; co-led by Andrea Howe and Charles H. Green. Don’t delay; there are only three seats left at the special early registration tuition!

Trust Breakfast Part II Video: Q&A

Trust Summit Part 2 Q&AMore from the TrustSummit at the Harvard Club, New York, on October 23.  The open statements, Part I, were available on yesterday’s blogpost

Today’s Part II of the video is all Q&A: questions from the audience, and answers from David Maister, Julien Smith, Chris Brogan, and yours truly.

There is 75 minutes of video here, so to help you navigate, here is a rough map of the questions asked and the time marker at which they are asked, plus a sample quote:

   1:11    -How do you put a number on the value of engagement and trust?  (David: if measurement drove trust, we could lose weight by standing on the bathroom scale)

11:00    -What role does the fear of failure play in shutting down trust? (Charlie: in trust, risk mitigation doesn’t just cut risk–it increases trust)

16:30    -What was the best response you’ve seen to a screwup?  (Chris: Coke hit a home run; Branson hits lots of singles, so they can risk losing a few)

21:00    -Doesn’t price beat trust at some level? (Julien: intimacy is a great differentiator)

27:00    -Isn’t customer intimacy just one strategy, and you can only pick one?  (Charlie: these days you can’t pick only one; trust is actually the way you get to scale for low-cost strategies, not just intimacy.  Chris Brogan: Vanilla Ice said: stop, collaborate, and listen.  David: if people trust you, you don’t have to do all that icky marketing stuff).

35:00    -What kind of metrics work with non-profits? (David: if companies were serious about metrics, they’d post their customer satisfaction ratings) 

41:00    -How do I transfer powerful online trust to an MBA-managed traditional business?  (Chris: Let revenue do the talking.   Julien: I’d urge a healthy level of scepticism about the social media Kool Aid. It’s an experiment; try it.) 

53:00    -How does a leader teach matters of virtue, in a corporation?  (Charlie: the doctrine of competition is essentially anti-ethical. If all you do is compete with others, you have no one left to be ethical toward. "Buddhist capitalism" works better.)

Trust Summit Part II56:00    -How do you balance privacy versus transparency?  (Chris: there are times for both).

58:00    -Can this kind of cool event actually happen outside of Twitter?  (Julien: the horizon effect, everyone gets closer to everyone else–it’s inevitable).

62:00    -What’s the generational impact of all this?  (David: We’ve talked about clients, but trust between generations is a very big issue within organizations, and we’re doing pathetically)

65:00    -Is there a danger of giving priority to squeaky wheel twitterers?  (Chris: In some ways, that’s odd.  We don’t really want to wait in line like sheep; twitter empowers).

69:00    -How can I use social media to create authenticity?  (Discussion: it varies with target audiences–reaching 5 people through social media is tough)

72:30    -Why do companies pay 4x to get new customers what they’d save in retention?  (Charlie: Stupidity in this area does abound).

73:30    -Charlie describes how Chris and Julien role-modeled all this behavior in setting up this event.

Enjoy.

You can see the video here.

 

 

 

Trust Summit Summary and Video – Part I

Last Friday, October 23, New York’s Harvard Club was host to the Trust Summit.

Put on by myself, David Maister, Chris Brogan and Julien Smith, and moderated expertly by Robin Carey (CEO of SocialMediaToday), it was a breakfast, panel discussion and Q&A session with 300 of our closest friends.

OK, maybe "Trust Summit" is a little grandiose, but I think the 300 didn’t mind much. And after all, Chris and Julien did write the very hot Trust Agents. And David and I (and Rob Galford) did write The Trusted Advisor, which has proven to have legs.

And we all, very much, talked about the same thing. Trust is vital in a new economy, just as it was and is an old economy. In fact, if anything, new social media are making trust even more central to successful business.

Robin asked at one point how many people there were on Twitter; about 99% raised their hands (excepting David, I think). More tellingly, when she asked how many signed up through the Twitter channel, the answer was remarkably similar.

Big thanks to Marvin Bzuro for making the video available to us. Thank him yourself, at marvin "at" b2bvid.com.

Today, we’re posting Part I of the video: it consists of opening remarks by Robin Carey, and by we four panelists. It runs to about 25 minutes. Tomorrow we’ll post the (lively!) Q&A session.

To see Part I of the video, click here.

The Twittersphere was hugely active before the session. And after. And during, for that matter. You can see the entire twit-fest on Twitter with a hashtag search: look for #trustsummit. And while you’re there, check out @chrisbrogan, @julien, and @charleshgreen

If you don’t want to do that, several twitterers did yeoman’s work summarizing for the sake of the rest of us. At the risk of ticking off all the others, I’ll single out @amandarykoff as the most re-tweeted summary. You can find it here. But honorable mentions also go to Fred Abramson, Andrew Marshall, PRBrew.com, and Articu-Blog.

And if that doesn’t satiate your appetite, then go watch the video again. And come back tomorrow for the Q&A.